Weekly Roundup – April 11, 2015

This is a weekly round up of book news, great reads, and other literary related stuff. Not all if it is new. 

The Millions this week published an article (adapted from a January New York Times article on love) about falling in love with a reader


The New Yorker has interesting articles about James Merrill, the poet, and Chris Krause, the novelist. 

Editor and Publisher wonders: Is the Party Over for Social Media?”

The New York Review of Books has a blog post by Charles Simic about reading late at night

The New York Times has an article about why “Writers Love to Hate the M.F.A.” by Cecilia Capuzzi Simon.

Also, Atticus Lish has won the prestigious Pen/Faulkner Prize for his first novel “Preparation for the Next Life.” This book was published by a small independent press, Tyrant Books. Mr. Lish expresses his disbelief in winning the award in a New York Times article.

Friday Finds: April 10, 2015

Friday Finds is a weekly blog meme hosted by Jenn at A Daily Rhythm.

I recently scored great books at area book sales.


From top to bottom of the stack:

  • An Episode of Sparrows by Rumer Godden
  • Dear Life by Alice Munro
  • Collected Stories of John O’Hara
  • Literary Brooklyn: The Writers of Brooklyn and the Story of American City Life by Evan Hughes
  • Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
  • A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  • The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
  • A Movable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
  • The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
  • Shore Chronicles: Diaries and Travelers’ Tales from the Jersey Shore 1764-1955 edited by Margaret Thomas Buchholz
  • The Story of Cinema by David Shipman
  • The Illustrated Brontes of Haworth by Brian Wilks
  • The Oxford Illustrated Literary Guide to Great Britain and Ireland edited by Dorothy Eagle and Hilary Carnell

Some of these books I have read before (McCullers, Knowles, Sinclair) but not for a long time. The Oxford Guide I have wanted for awhile, and the Illustrated Brontes is interesting because I own the DVD of the British series of the same name, and the Brontes are a fascinating family.